Hull Gold Post Box

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Washed Up Car-Go

Think I was a bit underwhelmed by the cars when I visited as part of Good Friday day out. But now it is pointed out it is amazing,  how got all sand in with doors and window closed. Maybe front window was taken out then put back  when all sand in?

Hull City of Culture: Good Friday day out

 

Amelia in Hull

Hey guys!! So last Saturday after we’d been to theHull Minster Making and Hanse Day Events, we went over to the Deep which is Hull’s very own Aquarium and we went over to look at the cars in the car park that are part of the ‘Washed Up Car-Go’ event. The ‘Washed Up Car-Go event is basically 3 ordinary looking cars in the Deep car park filled with sand, rocks and anything that’s to do with the beach or the sea. The cars play quite romantic music and display a film on a screen and ‘Washed Up Car-Go’ actually touches on issues such as pollution, consumeration and the tradition of marine art all through the films and plastic objects inside the cars. In today’s blog post, I’m going to be describing ‘Washed Up Car-Go’ to you all and giving you my opinion on it.

‘Washed Up Car-Go’ was…

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Hull City of Culture: Good Friday day out

Being Good Friday the museums of museum quarter Injand Ferens art gallery were closed, however I still found things to look at.

The Sping flowers in Princess Gardens were beautiful.

With Emperess pub in background
I also saw the temporary installations of daffiodils, present just for Easter weekend and poppies which are moving round the country during the centenary of the World War One years. The train station has dozens of boards showing all the men from Hull, who died in the First World War.


It is a shame all the redevelopment work was not completed before the year of culture as it means there are a lot of fences and barriers around.


The courts on Alfred Gelder street, are a very ornate building.


I went to the Deep car park to see installations within cars. These were not immediately obvious and it felt strange walking round car park  trying to look for art in cars as although I may be wanting to not ride.

For example, in this picture one of the cars is the nearest one in this picture ( little light green colour one) then another is same colour other end of row nearly completely hidden in this photo by a van.

The first car:


The second car:


The third car:


I would say don’t come to Hull just for cars. But have a look if you go to the Deep, particularly if you are in group and there is a long queue to get into the Deep; you can take it turns to look at cars / wait in line. From The marine or museum quarter the cars are only a 5/10minute diversion each way.

I was not, expecting to see any urinals during my day out but, saw several at Fountsain 17 during a 5minute stop; did not feel needed to study them. I also paid a quick visit to the Humber Gallery on the same street. The upstairs galleries has exhibition on untill mid June called Becoming the sea. To be honest it was rather space, various videos so did not engage me for long.

Downstairs there was a Raft of Medusa, a reference  had recently become aquatinted with due to car 2 at the Deep car park.


Also on Humber street was a couple of fun planters.


The paper exhibition 30June to 9th July, sounds interesting. At the launch the worlds favourite colour will be announced. At the I information point at the train station,  I picked up some stickers and cards about how to submit favourite colour.


Humber street is part of an 80million pound regeneration project. Around the area are teasers about what is to come…


I also briefly popped into Playing the Bridge, a multimedia installation on Scale bridge near the museum quarter. In the semi darkness, films played on large screens and a couple of people had different hammers which they banged on the metal to create eerie acoustics.

I may have only popped into some places very briefly but, still fun especially as I discovered today and on previous visit during year of culture there is lots to see around.

During the day I only saw one Amy Johnson moth in St Stephens, not sure if this is now it’s permanent home as other moths have moved.

Hull hot chocolate at Cocoa Chocolatier

More Hull Wonderwalls

Hot chocolate at the Real McCoy Hull.

Wondewalls: Hull City of Culture

30+ moths, 2 toads; Land of Green Ginger, gold Post box and Gold phone box; features of a walk around Hull

Model of Amy Johnson’s Jason in the train station

Amy Johnson statue

Willberforce column

Fish embedded in pavement in front of city hall

Hull Daffodils and Poppies: As I wandered lonely as a cloud…


As I wandered lonely as a cloud,

All at once I saw a crowd,

A crowd of tourists to Hull,

Around lego daffodils and metal poppies they mull.


The daffodils are in Hull over Easter untill Tuesday 18th.


The poppies started life at the Tower of London in 2014. 2014 marked 100 years since the start of World War One. The moat of the Tower of London was filled with individual ceramic poppies. Each of the poppies symbolised one military death, during world war 1, startling to consider there were 888,246 (numbers based on 2010 audit of Commonwealth graves) and that was just the military deaths during World War One from Britain. Each day whilst the installation in the Tower of London the names of the dead that the poppies represented were read out. These individual poppies where sold for charity. 

 

In addition to the poppies in the moat there was also an installation called Weeping Window, which was a cascade of poppies that appeared to pour from one of the castle windows into the most. I never got to see the installations at the Tower of London, alas for the benefit of myself and others the Weeping Window has been touring the country since it’s departure from the Tower of London. I first saw the installation draped over a bridge, appearing to pour into a river at the Yorkshire Sculpture park in November 2015. It is currently in Hull and due later this year to visit; Southend on Sea, Plymouth, Derby, Belefast and Cardiff.


Poppies are symbolic of the First World War due to a poem called Flander’s fields. Flanders fields describes how in the deviation in Flanders of dug up earth for soldiers graves the first flower to flower we’re bright red poppies a symbol of life from death.


The poppies are in Hull untill 14th May. They are in the same square where the Blade previously was. The current remains of the Blade, is an ugly fence round where it was.

30+ moths, 2 toads; Land of Green Ginger, gold Post box and Gold phone box; features of a walk around Hull

 One of Hull’s heros is Amy Johnson. I have not seen them, but there is statues of her on Prospect Street and near one of her homes in Hawthorn avenue. Untill March 2017 there are 30+ moths in Hull in her honour. Possibly after, the auction of them in April some will be bought and put back on display.

Tips for viewing Amy Johnson’s moths

Butterfly net out; to catch Amy Johnson Inspired Moths

In 2010 there was a similar project to honour Hull poet Philip Larkin; Larkin with toads. I have seen two toads that remain in Hull; there may be more!

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Outside Hull’s Historical centre
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In Museum Quarter
In the train station there is also a statue of Phillip Larkin.

 

Hull along with Beverley has white phone boxes instead of the usual red of the rest of the UK. It seems they also have one gold phone box; there is no explanation around it as to why it is gold.


The gold post box on Hessle road is in honour of Luke Campbell’s gold medal in the 2012 olympics when London hosted.


The Land of Green Ginger is a street in the centre of Hull. It’s name possibly coming from the  twising  of the name, of a Dutch family that lived in Hull in the early 19th centruy. The family name was Lindegreen Jonger which means green lime street. Or perhapas, it references the spices that came into the nearby docks. A range of goods and people travelled to and through the docks. A sculpture along the Humber shows a faimly who have arrived at the docks from North Europe who then proceeded by train to Liverpool and from there by boat to America.


The family sculture is between the Humber and Hull’s marina which forward of Princess Quay shopping city.Walking away from the marina, towards the Deep in front of the pub, come to tables and benches with typical Hull phrases recorded.


Recognising Hull’s fishing and sea faring history, Zebedee’s yard has a tributary scultpture, into which flowers can be placed.


Hull has many scultpures. the newest being the Blade in Queen Victoria Square which was positioned in January 2017 as part of city of culture. Before I went  I had heard it was part of a theme of looking up, looking up from the ubiquitous phone and noticing what is going an around. The Blade is certainly big and therefore,  causes people to gather, around it. It is not that high up; you can see it without lifiting your head. The highest part is the tip that, protrudes acrooss above the road. At least one of the emotions experincec by crowds in Queen Victoria Square , will be puzzlement. It is impressive in size but, other than that is rather stark with no adornment and a very simple shape some may consider it rather phalic like. It is for all to judge.