Leeke Gold Post Box

In honour of Anna Watkins, tower.

Advertisements

30+ moths, 2 toads; Land of Green Ginger, gold Post box and Gold phone box; features of a walk around Hull

 One of Hull’s heros is Amy Johnson. I have not seen them, but there is statues of her on Prospect Street and near one of her homes in Hawthorn avenue. Untill March 2017 there are 30+ moths in Hull in her honour. Possibly after, the auction of them in April some will be bought and put back on display.

Tips for viewing Amy Johnson’s moths

Butterfly net out; to catch Amy Johnson Inspired Moths

In 2010 there was a similar project to honour Hull poet Philip Larkin; Larkin with toads. I have seen two toads that remain in Hull; there may be more!

img_7198
Outside Hull’s Historical centre
img_7199
In Museum Quarter
In the train station there is also a statue of Phillip Larkin.

 

Hull along with Beverley has white phone boxes instead of the usual red of the rest of the UK. It seems they also have one gold phone box; there is no explanation around it as to why it is gold.


The gold post box on Hessle road is in honour of Luke Campbell’s gold medal in the 2012 olympics when London hosted.


The Land of Green Ginger is a street in the centre of Hull. It’s name possibly coming from the  twising  of the name, of a Dutch family that lived in Hull in the early 19th centruy. The family name was Lindegreen Jonger which means green lime street. Or perhapas, it references the spices that came into the nearby docks. A range of goods and people travelled to and through the docks. A sculpture along the Humber shows a faimly who have arrived at the docks from North Europe who then proceeded by train to Liverpool and from there by boat to America.


The family sculture is between the Humber and Hull’s marina which forward of Princess Quay shopping city.Walking away from the marina, towards the Deep in front of the pub, come to tables and benches with typical Hull phrases recorded.


Recognising Hull’s fishing and sea faring history, Zebedee’s yard has a tributary scultpture, into which flowers can be placed.


Hull has many scultpures. the newest being the Blade in Queen Victoria Square which was positioned in January 2017 as part of city of culture. Before I went  I had heard it was part of a theme of looking up, looking up from the ubiquitous phone and noticing what is going an around. The Blade is certainly big and therefore,  causes people to gather, around it. It is not that high up; you can see it without lifiting your head. The highest part is the tip that, protrudes acrooss above the road. At least one of the emotions experincec by crowds in Queen Victoria Square , will be puzzlement. It is impressive in size but, other than that is rather stark with no adornment and a very simple shape some may consider it rather phalic like. It is for all to judge.